Friday, 22 January 2010

The New Address

Elegant Cuisine, which has existed at Elegant Survival since 2006, has an official new address, so that M-J can better keep track of all her recipes:

The New Address

Elegant Cuisine, which has existed at Elegant Survival since 2006, has an official new address, so that M-J can better keep track of all her recipes:

Thursday, 21 January 2010

Still Life with Fruit Smoothie

Elegant Roast Beef

Elegant Roast Beef
Pot Roast with Vegetables: an Elegant Meal

Elegant Roast Beef


Elegant Cakes


Elegant Eggs Vienna


Elegant Eggs Vienna

Please Visit Elegant Cook for M-J's Eggs Vienna Recipe

Elegant Stir-Fry

Elegant Stir-Fry


Elegant Apple Pie





Elegant Salad


Elegant Pantry


M-J's New Mexico Chile Almonds

M-J’s Roasted New Mexican Chile Almonds, © 2007

Soak one pound (16 ounces) of raw almonds in brine (I use health-promoting Himalayan salt) and red chile powder (New Mexican is the best). A teaspoon of sugar or honey added to the brine will ensure that the mixture adheres to the nuts. I like to use agave nectar when it is available. After ten minutes, drain them and spread almonds out on a baking sheet. Reserve the chile/salt liquid. Roast in medium-hot oven for half an hour. Test for crunchiness only when completely cooled. If they are not tasty or crunchy enough for your taste, repeat the process by just dredging the almonds in the reserved liquid, then bake again for ten to twenty minutes, being careful not to burn the nuts. Almonds ought not to be eaten raw, as they contain a small amount of cyanide until they are roasted. A three-pound bag of Diamond Raw Almonds from California is available at Sam’s Club for about ten dollars. These roasted nuts are an excellent party offering. Roasting the nuts this way is superior to coating them with oil, because your guests, even if they're not opposed to the stuff, won't welcome it all over their clothes.

Green Chile Chicken Noodle Soup

 
M-J’s Original Recipe
Boil three cups of Country Pasta egg noodles (from Montana, available at Sam’s Club) in  ten cups of chicken broth diluted with water, or water to which some chicken bouillon concentrate has been added. I used two tablespoons of Tone’s brand chicken base (Tennessee and Iowa, USA), available at Sam’s. Mix one tablespoon of flour with three tablespoons of the broth, and stir it into the simmering soup as a thickener if desired. Add a half-cup (or more to your taste) of chopped green chiles either from Hatch of New Mexico or El Paso brand (Texas) in cans. Then, when the egg noodles or pasta strips are soft, in about thirty minutes, stir-in a half-cup of sour cream.
© M-J de Mesterton 2010

Green Chile Chicken Noodle Soup

 
M-J’s Original Recipe
Boil three cups of Country Pasta egg noodles (from Montana, available at Sam’s Club) in  ten cups of chicken broth diluted with water, or water to which some chicken bouillon concentrate has been added. I used two tablespoons of Tone’s brand chicken base (Tennessee and Iowa, USA), available at Sam’s. Mix one tablespoon of flour with three tablespoons of the broth, and stir it into the simmering soup as a thickener if desired. Add a half-cup (or more to your taste) of chopped green chiles either from Hatch of New Mexico or El Paso brand (Texas) in cans. Then, when the egg noodles or pasta strips are soft, in about thirty minutes, stir-in a half-cup of sour cream.
© M-J de Mesterton 2010

Monday, 18 January 2010

Eggs Vienna




M-J's Eggs Vienna First Recipe for Eggs Vienna on the Internet, by M-J de Mesterton 2006

Eggs Vienna by M-J de Mesterton © 2006

M-J de Mesterton's Eggs Vienna Recipe
An old friend of mine used to make this dish for me in the 1970s. I published my recipe for the unusual breakfast offering on Elegant Survival in 2006; it was for a long time the only recipe for Eggs Vienna on the internet. I shall reconstruct it here at Elegant Cuisine:
Eggs Vienna for Two
Prepare four slices of streaky American-style bacon until they are crisp. Poach two eggs in two cups of boiling milk, until they are soft. Toast two slices of white bread or English muffins, then butter them. When all three components are ready, place one piece of  toast in each of  two soup-bowls. Place two slices of  bacon on top of each piece of toast, then top that with a poached egg. Pour the remaining hot milk, in which the eggs have been poached, into each bowl.

Sunday, 17 January 2010

Elegant Salad





Making an Elegant Salad, 2009 May 15

When preparing a salad, arrange the components in such a way that they sit in layers or groups. It looks neater this way, and more appealing than the already-tossed salad. Let individual guests mix and dress it in their respective bowls. This idea is a bit like the “composed salad” of old. Pass around the dressing, and perhaps offer a couple of varieties, such as vinaigrette and Roquefort/blue cheese.

~~M-J de Mesterton Copyright 2009





Keep Your Salad Covered before Serving to Prevent Fruit-Flies (Photo Copyright Elegant Survival)






Friday, 15 January 2010

The Health-Benefits of Eggs

Eggs don’t cause heart disease, as the medical industry previously believed. And here is more good news: a research team at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge determined that women on a weight-loss regimen who ate an egg with toast and jelly each morning lost twice as many pounds as those who had a bagel breakfast with the same number of calories without the accompanying egg.


Huevos, by Spanish Court Painter Velásquez


Eggs are nutritious, convenient, useful in thousands of recipes, and are a relatively inexpensive source of high-quality protein.
One large egg, which represents less than 4 percent of the total daily calorie intake of a person who consumes 2000 calories per day, provides 10 percent of the Daily Value for protein, 15 percent of the Daily Value for riboflavin, and 4 percent or more of the Daily Value for several other nutrients, including vitamins A, B6 and B12; folate; iron; phosphorus; and zinc. Eggs also provide choline, which is  essential in the human diet, and is credited for helping to create healthy babies during pregnancy. Because the percentage of the  recommended  daily amount for many nutrients provided by an egg is greater than the proportion of total calorie intake that the egg represents, the egg more than pulls its weight nutritionally. Most of the vitamins and minerals in eggs are found in the yolk; protein, however, is found in both the yolk and the white.
Recent research indicates that egg eaters are more likely than non-egg eaters to have diets that provide adequate amounts of essential nutrients. This seems to be partly due to the nutritional contribution of the eggs themselves and partly due to the fact that the inclusion of eggs in the diet is an indicator of a desirable eating pattern that includes breakfast.
Eggs can be prepared easily, in a variety of ways. They keep well  in the refrigerator for about three weeks, and therefore an individual can easily use up the dozen eggs in a carton before they spoil. Because most egg recipes involve short cooking times, eggs are convenient for the person with little time to prepare meals.
Eggs have several important physical and chemical properties that help make recipes work. They thicken custards, puddings and sauces; emulsify and stabilize mixtures such as mayonnaise and salad dressings; coat or glaze breads and cookies; bind ingredients together in dishes such as meat loaf and lasagne; eggs are used to clarify coffee and soups; retard crystallization in boiled candies and frostings; and leaven some types of baked goods such as cakes, cookies, soufflés, buns and sponge cakes.
Eggs are economical, especially when compared to other high-protein foods. For people who are trying to balance their budgets as well as their diets, serving eggs occasionally instead of meat, poultry, or fish is very economical.
One other  benefit of eggs is that they are a functional food—that is, a food that provides health benefits that go beyond basic nutrition. Eggs contain the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, two components which are believed to have health benefits.

The Health-Benefits of Eggs

Eggs don’t cause heart disease, as the medical industry previously believed. And here is more good news: a research team at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge determined that women on a weight-loss regimen who ate an egg with toast and jelly each morning lost twice as many pounds as those who had a bagel breakfast with the same number of calories without the accompanying egg.




Huevos, by Spanish Court Painter Velásquez



Eggs are nutritious, convenient, useful in thousands of recipes, and are a relatively inexpensive source of high-quality protein.
One large egg, which represents less than 4 percent of the total daily calorie intake of a person who consumes 2000 calories per day, provides 10 percent of the Daily Value for protein, 15 percent of the Daily Value for riboflavin, and 4 percent or more of the Daily Value for several other nutrients, including vitamins A, B6 and B12; folate; iron; phosphorus; and zinc. Eggs also provide choline, which is  essential in the human diet, and is credited for helping to create healthy babies during pregnancy. Because the percentage of the  recommended  daily amount for many nutrients provided by an egg is greater than the proportion of total calorie intake that the egg represents, the egg more than pulls its weight nutritionally. Most of the vitamins and minerals in eggs are found in the yolk; protein, however, is found in both the yolk and the white.
Recent research indicates that egg eaters are more likely than non-egg eaters to have diets that provide adequate amounts of essential nutrients. This seems to be partly due to the nutritional contribution of the eggs themselves and partly due to the fact that the inclusion of eggs in the diet is an indicator of a desirable eating pattern that includes breakfast.
Eggs can be prepared easily, in a variety of ways. They keep well  in the refrigerator for about three weeks, and therefore an individual can easily use up the dozen eggs in a carton before they spoil. Because most egg recipes involve short cooking times, eggs are convenient for the person with little time to prepare meals.
Eggs have several important physical and chemical properties that help make recipes work. They thicken custards, puddings and sauces; emulsify and stabilize mixtures such as mayonnaise and salad dressings; coat or glaze breads and cookies; bind ingredients together in dishes such as meat loaf and lasagne; eggs are used to clarify coffee and soups; retard crystallization in boiled candies and frostings; and leaven some types of baked goods such as cakes, cookies, soufflés, buns and sponge cakes.
Eggs are economical, especially when compared to other high-protein foods. For people who are trying to balance their budgets as well as their diets, serving eggs occasionally instead of meat, poultry, or fish is very economical.
One other  benefit of eggs is that they are a functional food—that is, a food that provides health benefits that go beyond basic nutrition. Eggs contain the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, two components which are believed to have health benefits.

Sunday, 3 January 2010

M-J's Baked Pineapple Chunks, Ready to be Deployed

M-J's Potage de Celeri




M-J de Mesterton's Potage de Celeri (Cream of Celery Soup), Photos and Recipe Copyright 2007



M-J de Mesterton's Original Recipe:
Low-Carbohydrate Cream of Celery Soup
Potage de Celeri
Wash thoroughly a whole head of celery, by cutting the bottom off and bathing the stalks in a sinkful of water. With French chef’s knife, chop finely. Include the celery leaves, which are packed with flavour. In a large pot, melt two tablespoons of butter. Put the chopped celery in, and add a teaspooon of salt, one half-teaspoon of cumin, and freshly ground black pepper to taste. Saute until bright green and almost soft. Stir in a tablespoon of cornstarch (cornflour), which has seven grams of carbs. Saute for two more minutes, and then add one cup of cream and two cups of water. Simmer for ten minutes. Serves six. This soup is a good accompaniment to croques monsieurs for luncheon.
~~Copyright M-J de Mesterton, February 2007



Yams and Sweet Potatoes for a Healthy, Long Life